Deceptive Defense


frs1016@centurylink.net

In the final of the Senior Knockout Teams at the Fall NABC, Eric Rodwell earned a swing for his team with a good deceptive play.

Dlr: South ♠ A 7 5
Vul: None 4 3
A Q 9 8
♣ Q J 8 2
♠ 2 ♠ K 10 8 3
J 8 7 6 5 Q 10 9 2
K 6 5 2 7
♣ A 7 6 ♣ K 5 4 3
♠ Q J 9 6 4
A K
J 10 4 3
♣ 10 9
South West North East
1♠ Pass 4♠ All Pass

Opening lead — 6

At both tables, South played at 4♠. When Rodwell was East, South’s opening bid of 1♠ was limited in strength, so North simply jumped to game. West led a heart, and South took the king and led the ♠J: deuce, five … and Rodwell followed with the eight.

South could have led a low spade next, planning to insert dummy’s seven as a safety play for one trump loser if West played the three. But South didn’t know he could afford to play safe; East might have held the K.

Trump Tricks

It looked as if East had the bare eight or doubleton 10-8 anyway, so South led the queen next. Rodwell was sure of two trump tricks. Down one.

At the other table, the pro sitting East missed the textbook falsecard: He won the first spade with his king. Later, South picked up the trumps and made his game when the diamond finesse won.

Daily Question

You hold: ♠A 7 5   4 3 A Q 9 8    ♣Q J 8 2.
Your partner opens 1♣, you respond 1 and he bids 1. What do you say?

ANSWER
If a jump-preference to 3♣ would be forcing in your partnership, that bid would be fine. But many pairs treat such a jump as invitational. (What would you bid with ♠A 7 5 4 3 . A Q 9 8 ♣J 10 8 2?) Then you must invent a forcing call. Bid 1♠, a “fourth-suit” bid that merely asks partner to continue describing his hand.
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