Not A Clue


frs1016@centurylink.net

Cy the Cynic says that anything is possible for someone who doesn’t have a clue what he is talking about.

Dlr: South ♠ 7 3 2
Vul: All 10 8 2
6 2
♣ A Q 5 3 2
♠ Q J 10 4 ♠ K 8 6
K 5 Q 7 6 4
10 7 4 J 9 8 3
♣ 10 9 7 6 ♣ 8 4
♠ A 9 5
A J 9 3
A K Q 5
♣ K J
South West North East
2NT Pass 3NT All Pass

Opening lead — ♠Q

At 3NT, today’s South won the third spade, took the ♣K, overtook his jack with the queen and cashed the ace. East discarded a heart, and South pitched a diamond. South next led dummy’s 10, hoping East had both the king and queen, but West won with the king and took his good spade and good club for down one.

“I was quite unlucky,” South orated. “The clubs rated to break evenly.”

Correct Play

South was either a beginner or a con artist. The chance of a 3-3 club break was only about 36 percent, and South’s total chances were only a little over 50 percent. South’s correct play was to overtake the ♣K at the fourth trick and let the 8 ride.

Later, declarer would overtake his ♣J to lead the 10, winning three hearts, a spade, two clubs and three diamonds. His chances would be at least 75 percent.

Daily Question

You hold:
♠ K 8 6
Q 7 6 4
J 9 8 3
♣8 4
Your partner opens 1♣, you respond 1 and he bids 1♠. What do you say?

ANSWER
Opener’s bid of a new suit at the minimum level is not forcing. Since your partner did not jump, he has fewer than 19 points and may have as few as 12. Pass. Game is impossible. But if partner’s first bid had been 1, you would go to 2; a cheap preference is no stronger than a pass.
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