Retro Edition

Matchpoints. None vulnerable.
♠A 10 8 6 4   10 9 8 4   8 6 4   ♣7

West North East South
1♠ Pass
1NT Dbl 2 ?
2 2♠ 2NT
3♣ 3 3 3♠ 3NT
4♣ 4 4 4♠ 4NT
5♣ 5 5 5♠ 5NT
6♣ 6 6 6♠ 6NT
7♣ 7 7 7♠ 7NT
Pass Dbl

What’s your call?

Click to reveal awards
Bid Award
2 100
Pass 60
Dbl 30
3 30

For yesterday’s It’s Your Call deal (from May 2010’s Bridge Bulletin), 2 was named top bid.

After North’s takeout double, the majority chose to bid their major suit.

“2,” said Barry Rigal. “I hate to sell out.”

Jeff Meckstroth agreed. “At this color, I would prefer to declare,” he said.

“I choose 2, but it’s not as clear as I would like because of the three low diamonds,” said Mike Lawrence.

“We think 2 is unlikely to succeed, but double doesn’t feel right and will lead to a poor result if the opponents can scramble at least seven tricks,” said Linda and Robb Gordon. “That thinking leads us to bid 2, which is likely to make or might just push the opponents to a higher level.”

“2 is where the money is,” said Larry Cohen. “Let’s try to play our eight-card fit at the two level.”

“I have only 4 high-card points, but they are an ace,” said Brad Theurer. “I also have a singleton and partner should have four hearts. By bidding 2, I might even get a chance to double them at the three level.”

“Competing for the partial is necessary at matchpoints,” said Kay and Randy Joyce, “although we suspect the strength of our hand is defense.”

“2 is the straight value bid,” said Mel Colchamiro.

“At matchpoints, we bid 2, what we think we can make,” said Kitty and Steve Cooper. “Partner asked us to bid and we have four hearts.”

“2 is easy,” said Steve Robinson. “Partner made a takeout double, and I have four cards in the unbid major.”

“I can’t pass because it could pass out in 2 for a terrible score,” said Allan Falk. “I have to compete.”

Some experts saw the weak heart suit and chose to pass.

“This is close to a 2 bid,” said Jill Meyers. “The problem with that is that partner may have only three-card support. On defense, I have a good lead of a stiff club. The suits don’t look to be breaking well.”

“This reeks of a misfit, so stay out,” agreed August Boehm.

“One trick and four weak hearts isn’t enough to enter this non-fitting auction,” said Karen Walker, “especially because we may not have an eight-card heart fit. Partner can bid again if he’s loaded.”

“I like to push the opponents when I can,” said Don Stack, “but I don’t believe that I’m entitled to a bid. I have good defense with my spade stack and singleton club. Partner has another bid coming if our side needs to compete further.”

“They probably don’t have a fit,” said Kerri Sanborn. “Partner can still act, and if LHO prefers spades, we might have a profitable penalty.”

Partner asks you to bid, so do so.

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