Retro Edition

IMPs. None vulnerable.
♠10   A Q  A K 10 9 7 6  ♣J 10 4 2

West North East South
1
Pass; 1♠ Pass ?

What’s Your Call?

1NT
2♣ 2 2 2♠ 2NT
3♣ 3 3 3♠ 3NT
4♣ 4 4 4♠ 4NT
5♣ 5 5 5♠ 5NT
6♣ 6 6 6♠ 6NT
7♣ 7 7 7♠ 7NT
Dbl Pass
Click to reveal awards
Bid Award
2 100
2♣ 80
3 40
1NT 0

A close decision

With 6–4 distribution, experts often rebid their six‑card suit with a minimum minimum, but rebid their four‑card suit with a little extra. In this case, half the panel choose 2. Why?

Sutherlins: “Our minor‑suit disparity is too much to bid 2♣. A 6–1 diamond fit will play better than a 4–3 club fit.”

Meyers: “If my clubs were better, I would bid 2♣, but partner may pass with a singleton diamond and two or three low clubs.”

Colchamiro: “I’m a big believer in showing the second suit first, but the disparity in strength dissuades me. If I bid 2, I have easy rebids over most continuations.”

Sanborn: “It is close whether to bid 2 or 3. When I have a choice, I think I need seven and one‑half tricks to jump — this doesn’t quite make it.”

Meckstroth: “I like 2 because 3NT likely belongs from my side and this gives partner more room.”

Falk: “Partner’s bid did not improve my hand, so if the auction is going to end in a partscore, I’d prefer diamonds to clubs. If I bid 2♣, I’m minimum for bidding a 6–4 hand this way. If I bid 2 now, I have extras for any continuation. This isn’t close to a 3 or any other strength‑showing bid.”

Two experts disagree.

“3 seems right on suit‑quality and values,” says Rigal. “Unless partner has five clubs, that suit is for the birds.”

“This is pretty close to a textbook 3 bid,” agrees Walker. “With a suit this strong, there’s no need to mislead partner about suit quality by rebidding 2♣.”

Seven panelists choose 2♣.

Stack: “This is a good 6–4 hand with the 10s carrying weight, so I will start with 2♣ and hope that I get a chance to bid diamonds later. If this were a bad 6–4, I would rebid diamonds.”

Robinson: “2♣ is what you bid with a two and one‑half diamond bid.”

Boehm: “I’m in between 2 and 3, so I’ll settle for the 2♣ temporizing move and bid 3 next, if I get the chance.”

Lawrence: “Bidding 2♣ is the standard approach. I intend to bid 3 next, if possible.”

Gordon: “This is not strong enough for 3. There’s no reason not to introduce the second suit. It’s amazing how many good games and slams are missed when the four‑card suit is bypassed to rebid the six‑card suit.”

North’s 1♠ response didn’t improve the South hand, so most of the panel rejected 3. A 2 rebid is more likely to get you to the best partscore. Rebidding 2♣ is more likely to get you to the best game. The panel sees this as a close decision.

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