The Real Deal


www.larryco.combridgecruises_lessons@larryco.com

5-6-7

I played this deal in an online game. As South, I held:

♠ 10 6 5  10 2    A 2  ♣ A K 9 8 6 5

My right-hand opponent dealt and opened with a weak 2. We were not vulnerable against vulnerable, which helped rationalize my light overcall of 3♣. LHO preempted to 4 and we made our way to 6♣. I received a diamond lead, and it was easy:

Dlr:
East
Vul:
E-W
North
♠ A Q 4
A Q J 9 8
7
♣ Q J 10 7
South
♠ 10 6 5
A10 2
A 2
♣ A K 9 8 6 5

Not much of a lesson here. I won the A, drew trumps ending in hand (they were 2–1) and led the 10. More on my result later.

This deal piqued my interest because I thought it would make a good Real Deal, had the opening lead been a low spade. In fact, here is the problem I pose: How would you play on a low spade lead if you were in 5♣? Or in 6♣? Or in 7♣?

In 7♣, you shouldn’t risk the spade finesse. You need the heart finesse anyway, so win the ♠A, draw trumps and run the 10. Your 10 holds (you needed that!); only a really bad layout will doom you at this point.

What would you do on that annoying low spade lead in 6♣? If you win the ♠A and rely on the heart finesse, you will be defeated when the K is wrong. Better is to try the ♠Q at trick one. If it wins, you are home free. If it loses, you can fall back on the heart finesse. That gives you roughly a 75% chance (making when LHO has either major-suit king).

If you underbid to 5♣, you should not finesse the ♠Q at trick one. That is the only way to go down. If RHO has both major-suit kings and LHO has the ♠J, finessing will hold you to 10 tricks. RHO will win the ♠K and return a spade to your 10, LHO’s jack and dummy’s ace. Now, if you take a losing heart finesse, you will go down in five!

The way to assure your contract – and still make overtricks if the lead is from ♠K J – is by playing low from dummy at trick one! Even if RHO wins the jack, he can’t get at dummy’s spades. Given RHO’s opening 2 , the spade lead can’t be a singleton. Or, if you want to try for two overtricks, you can win the ♠A at trick one, draw trumps and try the heart finesse. You’ll end up making either five (losing a heart and a spade) or seven.

Let’s review that. On a low spade lead, your strategy in 5♣, 6♣ and 7♣ is to play the ♠4 or ♠A at trick one, the ♠Q at trick one and ♠A at trick one respectively! The teacher and logician in me is easily amused by such things. This was the Real Deal:

Dlr:
East
Vul:
E-W
North
♠ A Q 4
A Q J 9 8
7
♣ Q J 10 7
West
♠ J 8 7 2
7 6 5 3
Q 10 9 5
♣ 3
East
♠ K 9 3
K 4
K J 8 6 4 3
♣ 4 2
South
♠ 10 6 5
10 2
A 2
♣ A K 9 8 6 5

As you can see, on the easy diamond lead, I made 12 tricks in 6♣. A spade lead would have defeated my slam. On a spade lead against 5♣, declarer will go down if he plays dummy’s ♠Q at trick one.